TALB Update: Friday, November 5, 2021

TALB Update: Friday, November 5, 2021

Friday November 5, 2021

District lays our their bargaining proposals

LBUSD “sunshined” their bargaining proposals at the regularly scheduled Board of Education meeting on Wednesday, November 3, 2021. There are some initial thoughts, but we hope you engage your colleagues on what the implications of these proposals could mean.

LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
GOVERNING BOARD INITIAL PROPOSAL (is this the Board’s proposal or Executive Staff?)
CERTIFICATED BARGAINING
K-12 UNIT
2021-2022 NEGOTIATIONS

The Governing Board of the Long Beach Unified School District (“District”) submits this Initial Proposal to the Teachers Association of Long Beach (“TALB”) for 2021-2022 negotiations. The District proposes to maintain the provisions of the current certificated collective bargaining agreement except as modified below:

ARTICLE II – Recognition of Exclusive Representative
F. Update contract with technical language changes.
ARTICLE III: Reserved Rights of the District
D. Review and update application of language as it relates to pandemics.
ARTICLE IV: Association Rights
A.4 Review and update application of language as it relates to cell phone use.
G. Update contract language with technical changes.
J.1 Update contract language with technical changes.
ARTICLE V: Days and Hours of Employment
A.1 Review and update application of language as it relates to Full Day Kindergarten.
A.2 Update contract language to include Transitional Kindergarten teachers.
A.3 Review and update contract language to align the application process for alternative schedules with current practice for changing Back to School Night and Open House Dates.
A.4 Update contract language with technical language changes.
B.5. Review and update language to align with current law.
B.6. Review and update language to address summer school and intersession eligibility.
B. Review and explore new language regarding the addition of paid professional development days to the work year. ARTICLE VI: Compensation
A.1 Discuss salaries in light of the current District budget and state revenues.
B. Update contract language to reflect current state health and welfare benefits regulations.
B.1 Update eligibility language to reflect changes outlined in the Domestic Partner MOU. Review and update Salary Schedule S – Certificated Employees Additional Assignment
ARTICLE VII: Leaves of Absence
Update contract language throughout Article VII to reflect changes to the California Family Rights Act (CFRA).
C.4 Update contract language with technical changes.
C.10 Update contract language with technical changes.
C.11 Update contract language regarding reimbursing the District for court payments received by employees following jury service during their duty year.
ARTICLE VIII: Transfers
A.4 Review and update language to add a specialized position classification for the Collaborative Co-Teach Program (CCT).
C.1 Review and update contract language to align with District equity work.
E.1 Review and update contract language to align with District equity work.
ARTICLE IX: Safety Conditions
N. Update contract language with technical changes.
ARTICLE X: Class Size and Staffing Ratios
A. Update contract language to include TK with Kindergarten class size ratios
ARTICLE XII: Evaluation Procedure
A. Update contract language to include exclusive usage of the online evaluation process and with technical changes pertaining to No Child Left Behind.
B. Update contract language with technical changes.
L. Update contract language to reflect current statutes.
New Section for Article XII: Review and develop language regarding a commitment to equity.
ARTICLE XIII: Grievance Procedure
B.1 Adjust language referring to “site manager” to bring into alignment with A.3 and B.2.
B.2 Adjust the time period for the immediate manager to provide the written response following an informal conference.
D.2 Adjust the time period for the respondent (Superintendent or Designee) to provide the written response following the conference.
H. Review and update contract language to reflect a specific timeline for the evaluatee to submit a written response. ARTICLE XVIII: Term of Agreement
A. Update contract language to reflect the new term of the agreement
ARTICLE XIX: Collaborative Co-Teach Program (CCT) (new article)
Develop a new article addressing key contractual components including the following:
● Teacher Selection, Transfers
● Training
● Home visits for Head Start CCT programs
● Onboarding and Teacher Partnership Development
● Days, Hours and Work Year
● Release Time and Planning Time
● Licensing
● Back to School Night and Open House
● Room Availability for IEPs
● Site Assignments & Evaluator Assignments
APPENDIX H: Shared Decision Making
A. Review and update current contract language regarding eligibility and the voting/selection process for site leadership positions including teacher council representative, department head, and pathway leads.


LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
GOVERNING BOARD INITIAL PROPOSAL (is this the Board’s proposal or Executive Staff?)
CERTIFICATED BARGAINING
CDC-HEAD START UNIT
2021-2022 NEGOTIATIONS

The Governing Board of the Long Beach Unified School District (“District”) submits this Initial Proposal to the Teachers Association of Long Beach (“TALB”) for 2021-2022 negotiations. The District proposes to maintain the provisions of the current certificated collective bargaining agreement except as modified below:
ARTICLE III: Reserved Rights of the District
D. Review application of language as it relates to pandemics.
ARTICLE IV: Association Rights
A.4 Review and update application of language as it relates to cell phone use.
G. Update contract language with technical changes.
J.1 Update contract language with technical changes.
ARTICLE V: Days and Hours of Employment
B.5 Review and update language to align with current law.
G. Discuss compensation for teachers working summer sessions.
ARTICLE VI: Compensation
A.1 Discuss salaries in light of the current District budget and state revenues.
B. Update contract language to reflect current health and welfare benefits.
B.1 Update eligibility language to reflect changes outlined in the Domestic Partner MOU.
ARTICLE VII: Leaves of Absence
Update contract language to reflect changes to the California Family Rights Act (CFRA).
C.4 Update contract language with technical changes.
C.10 Update language to reflect current practice regarding reimbursing the district for court payments issued to the employee for jury service during their duty year.
ARTICLE VIII: Transfers
C.3 Review and update language to address site consolidation.
New Language for Article VIII: Review and update language to add a specialized position classification for the Collaborative Co-Teach Program (CCT).
ARTICLE XI: Evaluation Procedure
L. Align language to reflect current statutes.
New Section for Article XII: Review and develop language regarding a commitment to equity.
ARTICLE XII: Grievance Procedure
B.1 Adjust language referring to “manager” to bring into alignment with A.3 and B.2.
B.2 Adjust the time period for the immediate manager to provide the written response following an informal conference.
D.2 Adjust the time period for the respondent (Superintendent or Designee) to provide the written response following the conference.
H. Revise contract language to reflect a specific timeline for the evaluatee to submit a written response for their permanent record.
ARTICLE XVII: Term of Agreement
A. Extend the collective bargaining agreement term thru June 30, 2025 and adjust reopener years.


Questions on college debt? California prepares to answer

While California is a relatively low-debt state, more than 500,000 students are delinquent or in default

NOVEMBER 2, 2021

MATT KRUPNICK

As thousands of California students apply for 2022 admission to the state’s colleges and universities, one big question remains unanswered for many of them: how to pay.

That confusion, due in part to inadequate communication from institutions, leads to far more students than necessary taking out loans. Nearly 4 million Californians owe $147 billion in student debt, according to the Student Borrower Protection Center, and more than 500,000 are delinquent or in default. While just a sliver of the borrowers, that’s still half a million students who face a rocky financial future. It’s especially an issue for Black or Latino residents who have higher default and delinquency rates than others, a new report notes.

With an eye on reducing debt problems, the state is preparing to hire its first student loan ombudsperson by the end of the year, and a panel of experts recently told the California Student Aid Commission – the agency responsible for managing Cal Grants – that the state should make significant changes to help students navigate college costs.

Better communication would prevent some students from borrowing money they don’t need, said Robert Shireman, a panelist and the director of higher education excellence at The Century Foundation.

“It’s about helping people access the resources that are there,” he said. “Knowing you can get a Pell Grant or a Cal Grant can help a student plan and take advantage of those options.”

Despite debt numbers that look shocking, California is a relatively low-debt state. Although the high cost of living significantly increases student expenses, the state’s public colleges and universities are far more affordable than those in most states, and Cal Grants and college-specific scholarship programs help defray remaining costs.

University of California Riverside student Brendan Rooks, 22, is just about to graduate with $10,000 in student debt. Although he has less debt than many of his classmates, he’s been frustrated by what he says is a lack of information about scholarship options. (Full Story)


The Great Resignation Is Accelerating

A lasting effect of this pandemic will be a revolution in worker expectations.

By Derek Thompson

I first noticed that something weird was happening this past spring.

In April, the number of workers who quit their job in a single month broke an all-time U.S. record. Economists called it the “Great Resignation.” But America’s quittin’ spirit was just getting started. In July, even more people left their job. In August, quitters set yet another record. That Great Resignation? It just keeps getting greater.

“Quits,” as the Bureau of Labor Statistics calls them, are rising in almost every industry. For those in leisure and hospitality, especially, the workplace must feel like one giant revolving door. Nearly 7 percent of employees in the “accommodations and food services” sector left their job in August. That means one in 14 hotel clerks, restaurant servers, and barbacks said sayonara in a single month. Thanks to several pandemic-relief checks, a rent moratorium, and student-loan forgiveness, everybody, particularly if they are young and have a low income, has more freedom to quit jobs they hate and hop to something else.

As I wrote in the spring, quitting is a concept typically associated with losers and loafers. But this level of quitting is really an expression of optimism that says, We can do better. You may have heard the story that in the golden age of American labor, 20th-century workers stayed in one job for 40 years and retired with a gold watch. But that’s a total myth. The truth is people in the 1960s and ’70s quit their jobs more often than they have in the past 20 years, and the economy was better off for it. Since the 1980s, Americans have quit less, and many have clung to crappy jobs for fear that the safety net wouldn’t support them while they looked for a new one. But Americans seem to be done with sticking it out. And they’re being rewarded for their lack of patience: Wages for low-income workers are rising at their fastest rate since the Great Recession. The Great Resignation is, literally, great.

For workers, that is. For the far smaller number of employers and bosses—who in pre-pandemic times were much more comfortable—this economy must feel like leaping from the frying pan of economic chaos, only to land in the fires of Manager Hell. Job openings are sky-high. Many positions are going unfilled for months. Meanwhile, supply chains are breaking down because of a hydra of bottlenecks. Running a company requires people and parts. With people quitting and parts missing, it must kinda suck to be a boss right now. (Oh, well!) (Full Story)


GET READY FOR THE GREAT URBAN COMEBACK
Visionary responses to catastrophes have changed city life for the better.

By Derek ThompsonOn December 16, 1835, New York’s rivers turned to ice, and Lower Manhattan went up in flames. Smoke had first appeared curling through the windows of a five-story warehouse near the southern tip of Manhattan. Icy gales blew embers into nearby buildings, and within hours the central commercial district had become an urban bonfire visible more than 100 miles away.
Firefighters were helpless. Wells and cisterns held little free-flowing water, and the rivers were frozen solid on a night when temperatures plunged, by one account, to 17 degrees below zero. The fire was contained only after Mayor Cornelius Lawrence ordered city officials to blow up structures surrounding it, starving the flames of fuel.
A new Manhattan would grow from the rubble—made of stone rather than wood, with wider streets and taller buildings. But the most important innovation lay outside the city. Forty-one miles to the north, New York officials acquired a large tract of land on both sides of the Croton River, in Westchester County. They built a dam on the river to create a 400-acre lake, and a system of underground tunnels to carry fresh water to every corner of New York City.
The engineering triumph known as the Croton Aqueduct opened in 1842. It gave firefighters an ample supply of free-flowing water, even in winter. More important, it brought clean drinking water to residents, who had suffered from one waterborne epidemic after another in previous years, and kick-started a revolution in hygiene. Over the next four decades, New York’s population quadrupled, to 1.2 million—the city was on its way to becoming a fully modern metropolis.
The 21st-century city is the child of catastrophe. The comforts and infrastructure we take for granted were born of age-old afflictions: fire, flood, pestilence. Our tall buildings, our subways, our subterranean conduits, our systems for bringing water in and taking it away, our building codes and public-health regulations—all were forged in the aftermath of urban disasters by civic leaders and citizen visionaries. (FULL STORY)

MOU Update
There is agreement surrounding 2 of the 4 mandated meetings a month, continuing to be virtual (Zoom) until the semester ends, January 27. In your next ILT meeting please discuss which meetings will be in-person or online via Zoom, for the months of November, December and January.


EASE-Y ANSWERS
GET SUPPORT FOR DIFFICULT TIMES
A little known benefit we have as educational employees in Los Angeles County is the Employee Assistance Service for Education program. EASE is a leading regional service that provides district staff and their families with the opportunity to assess and resolve their difficulties with the assistance of a professional counselor through an assessment and brief counseling service. EASE offers high quality, confidential assistance in:

  • Personal and family problems
  • Job-related issues
  • Stress
  • Substance abuse
  • Grief, loss and traumatic incidents
  • Worksite and phone consultations
All calls and consultations with EASE are confidential and will not be reported to the district, your school, or the Association. There is no reason to suffer in silence. If you feel you need assistance, please take advantage of this very important benefit by calling (800) 882-1341. A confidential counselor will be available to take your call.  More information is available on-line at https://www.lacoe.edu/Home/EASE

Trauma Resources
Reorienting to campus life has been challenging for students and staff. The pandemic has left invisible wounds and scars. There are 144 school days left in the 2021-22 school year. Do something for yourself, take care of yourself. We have a long road ahead.

~ Resources ~
Crisis & Trauma Resource Institute Handouts
Behavior Change
Crisis Response Checklist
Cyberstalking/Cyberbullying Safety Tips
Health Habit Log
How To Be An Ally
Mindful Breathing Tips
Myths About Suicide
Suicide Warning Signs
Principles for “Trauma – Informed”
Recognizing Anxiety
Self-Esteem Inventory

Find Your Words
Depression & Suicide Support

Number Story
Resources on adverse childhood experiences (ACES), ideas for support, healing, etc.

Books
Conscious Connections – Maggie Kline
Brain Changing Strategies to Trauma Proof our Schools

Onward: Cultivating Emotional Resilience in Educators by Elena Aguilar
Onward Workbook: Daily Activities to Cultivate Emotional Resilience and Thrive

Trainings 
Kaiser Mental Health Awareness Video
30 minute asynchronous training
Kaiser Mental Health Training Materials
Slide deck, Notice-Engage-Support model, conversation starters, mental health resources
Crisis & Trauma Resource Institute
Free monthly webinar, online training, train-the -trainer, public workshops, etc.
Trevor Project CARE (Connect, Accept, Respond, Empower) Training
An interactive and intensive training that provides adults with an overview of suicide among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & questioning (LGBTQ) youth, and the different environmental stressors that contribute to their heightened risk for suicide.
Cultivating Resilient Communities During a Crisis
Bright Morning is an international education, coaching and consulting firm that exists to bring new learning practices to organizations that aspire to interrupt inequities, build resilient communities, and heal and transform the world. Our work transforms schools into equitable places of learning where every child gets whatever they need, every day, in order to be successful and to thrive. Process matters. The journey is the destination. Therefore, we lead processes of creation and transformation that honor and nurture all of those involved.

Thank You!
Grateful people are happy people and happy people are grateful people. It may sound hackneyed, but there is plenty to celebrate. We ARE pulling through the last throes of the pandemic and it certainly isn’t easy out there. Be that as it may, WE appreciate your hard work and tenacity. You may not hear it often enough, but WE LOVE OUR MEMBERS. Thank you for being you!


~ Resources ~
Crisis & Trauma Resource Institute Handouts
Behavior Change
Crisis Response Checklist
Cyberstalking/Cyberbullying Safety Tips
Health Habit Log
How To Be An Ally
Mindful Breathing Tips
Myths About Suicide
Suicide Warning Signs
Principles for “Trauma – Informed”
Recognizing Anxiety
Self-Esteem Inventory

Find Your Words
Depression & Suicide Support

Number Story
Resources on adverse childhood experiences (ACES), ideas for support, healing, etc.

Books
Conscious Connections – Maggie Kline
Brain Changing Strategies to Trauma Proof our Schools

Onward: Cultivating Emotional Resilience in Educators by Elena Aguilar
Onward Workbook: Daily Activities to Cultivate Emotional Resilience and Thrive

Trainings 
Kaiser Mental Health Awareness Video
30 minute asynchronous training
Kaiser Mental Health Training Materials
Slide deck, Notice-Engage-Support model, conversation starters, mental health resources
Crisis & Trauma Resource Institute
Free monthly webinar, online training, train-the -trainer, public workshops, etc.
Trevor Project CARE (Connect, Accept, Respond, Empower) Training
An interactive and intensive training that provides adults with an overview of suicide among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & questioning (LGBTQ) youth, and the different environmental stressors that contribute to their heightened risk for suicide.
Cultivating Resilient Communities During a Crisis
Bright Morning is an international education, coaching and consulting firm that exists to bring new learning practices to organizations that aspire to interrupt inequities, build resilient communities, and heal and transform the world. Our work transforms schools into equitable places of learning where every child gets whatever they need, every day, in order to be successful and to thrive. Process matters. The journey is the destination. Therefore, we lead processes of creation and transformation that honor and nurture all of those involved.

Thank You!
Grateful people are happy people and happy people are grateful people. It may sound hackneyed, but there is plenty to celebrate. We ARE pulling through the last throes of the pandemic and it certainly isn’t easy out there. Be that as it may, WE appreciate your hard work and tenacity. You may not hear it often enough, but WE LOVE OUR MEMBERS. Thank you for being you! 


Financial Wellness Series Webinar / RSVP with Veronica Castillo at vcastillo@talb.org 

Estate Planning Basics Webinar | RSVP with Veronica Castillo at vcastillo@talb.org


Estate Planning Basics Webinar | RSVP with Veronica Castillo at vcastillo@talb.org

 


 


Bargaining 2021-22

TALB Bargaining Team

Corrin Hickey – Bargaining Chair, Lakewood HS
Gerry Morrison – McBride HS
John Kane – Jordan HS
Julie McCall – Nelson MS
John Solomon – MacArthur ES
Kevin Quinn – Los Cerritos ES
Maritza Summers – Mann ES
Sybil Baldwin – CDC
Maria Garcia – HS

This week’s ask…Bargaining support. The District has made their initial bargaining proposals. The Board of Education has to approve any agreements. Give the governing board some thoughts on their proposals.

WATCH LIVE – BOE – Meeting 11/17/2021 @ 5:00 p.m. 

LBUSD Board & Exec Staff Contact Info

Long Beach Unified School District’s YouTube ChannelWatch Live on Wednesday, October 6 @ 5:00 p.m. LBUSD YouTube Channel


CDC/Head Start Rep Council
11/16 @ 6:00 pm

Evaluation Forum
12/2/2021 4:00-5:00 p.m. To register, email Veronica Castillo at vcastillo@talb.org

Holiday / New Member Zoom Mixer
12/16/2021 5:00-6:00 p.m. To register, email Veronica Castillo at vcastillo@talb.org

Know Your Contract Forum
1/5/2022 5:00-6:00 p.m. To register, email Veronica Castillo at vcastillo@talb.org

CTA Conferences & Grants

Issues Conference – January 21-23, 2022, Las Vegas
Application Cut-0ff: November 8, 2021 at Midnight

Equity & Human Rights Conference – March 4-6, 2022, Location TBD
Application Cut-off: January 3, 2022, at Midnight

Good Teaching Conference South – March 18-20, 2022, Garden Grove
Application Cut-off: January 3, 2022 at Midnight

For full details and to apply for a grant, go to www.CTA.org/grants.


COVID Safety Protocols Not Being Followed?
If protocols are not being followed, please call the District’s COVID hotline at 562-204-6075 and or call the TALB office at 562-426-6433. The California Department of Public Health issued a requirement to School Leaders for universal masking for indoors, K-12 on August 23, 3021. It is a lengthy read, but non-compliance may have ramifications beyond the local employer – excerpt below:
Third, certificated individuals—including school administrators—may be subject to referral to the Commission on Teacher Credentialing for disciplinary action for violating a mandatory legal duty to implement the masking requirement and knowingly exposing students to preventable harm. (See Educ. Code § 44421 [authorizing discipline for “refusal to obey . . . laws regulating the duties of persons serving in the public school system”].)

Update your Beneficiaries
The cycle of life. Every year we have a few members pass. Your TALB/CTA/NEA membership provides a survivor’s benefit up to $6,000.00. Sadly, every now and again, we have a member pass who did not update their beneficiaries. We can only issue the benefit to the individual(s) listed on your survivor’s benefit form. Life comes at you fast. Relationships change. If you have any questions about your survivor’s benefit please call the office at 562-426-6433.


Federal Funding to Enhance Facilities

What condition is the furniture in your classroom? LBUSD is planning on using Federal Funding to provide facility improvements.Learning and play spaces across the Long Beach Unified School District will soon see enhancements designed to move the needle on student learning and safety. Facilities upgrades are one of several infrastructure improvements outlined in the LBUSD’s Learning Acceleration and Support Plan, which aims to elevate the educational experience for all students and offer interventions to learners who need additional support.

Upgrades to areas outside of the classroom start this summer and will be completed before the 2022-23 school year.

Bottle filling stations will be installed at all 85 district schools, providing students access to cool, clean drinking water and the hydration needed for a full day of learning and activities. More than 200 stations will be installed by December. (More Information Here)


Public Schools Long Beach Students Deserve

With Long Beach Unified School District set to receive over $460,000,000.00 in State & Federal aid, it is high time we look at the services we provide to our students.

Class Sizes/Ratios
Counselors
Librarians
Nurses
Psychologists
Speech Pathologists

Please start the conversations now, we will need to organize before Executive Staff make all the decisions and allocate all the resources.